Finding gluten-free pierogi in Poland

This has been an ongoing search for me: gluten-free pierogi in Poland. I love pierogi, but finding proper wheat-free ones has been difficult. So far, I’ve only found two restaurants that have them on their menus, sadly. However, I have found that Polish brand Bez Gluten makes a gluten-free version.

I’ll update this post if I find more places. In the meantime, here are the results of my searching.

Gluten-free pierogies at Pod Baranum.
Gluten-free pierogies at Pod Baranum.

Pod Baranem in Krakow:

A great place for dinner, this is a nice restaurant located near to the main square. They have a dedicated gluten-free kitchen, and also have lovely desserts. If you’re gluten-free, you gotta check this place out. Their pierogi ruskie are amazing and savory.

 

Gluten-free pierogies, courtesy of Bistro Friendly Food.
Gluten-free pierogies, courtesy of Bistro Friendly Food.

Bistro Friendly Food, Poznań

While Pod Baranem has white tablecloths, this is a airy cafe with a changing menu. Fair warning: while I lucked out on my visit, the menu seems to be always changing.

 

Obiadomek, Wroclaw

Full disclosure: while I live in Wroclaw, I haven’t checked this place out yet. However, their website says that if you call ahead, they can make gluten-free pierogi.

Bez gluten pierogi that I cooked at home.
Bez gluten pierogi that I cooked at home.

Self-catering: Bez Gluten

Another way to find gluten-free pierogi is to look for the Bez Gluten brand in health food stores. Organic Farma Zdrawia in the basement of Renoma, for example.

The packaging (so you know what to look for!)
The packaging (so you know what to look for!)

I talk about more gluten-free options in my post on Wroclaw Uncut.

Did I miss your favorite place? I’d love to know about a new place with gluten-free pierogi!

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Poznań, gluten-free pierogies, and family history

Poznań's Old Town.
Poznań’s Old Town.

A taste of authentic Polish pierogies, and a trip to a small Polish town near-ish to where my Polish ancestors came from— really a relaxing weekend.

While there are a number of vegetarian eateries in Poznań (check Happy Cow!) a combo of traveling on a holiday weekend, with many places closed, and focusing on a side trip, led me astray.

First stop was Bistro Friendly Food, a gluten-free restaurant and shop (conveniently located down the street from my hostel!) They had crepes, pasta and sandwiches on the menu— but I went straight for the pierogies, the Polish staple that’s so usually off-limits.

Gluten-free pierogies, courtesy of Bistro Friendly Food.
Gluten-free pierogies, courtesy of Bistro Friendly Food.

And these pierogies were amazing— simple, yet extremely flavorful, stuffed with the perfect amount of tangy cheese and earthy potatoes. Also, a great place to stock up on gluten-free products— in addition to Schar, they had a lot of Bez Gluten, the Polish brand of gluten-free products.

Gluten-free cheese toast, Bistro Friendly Food.
Gluten-free cheese toast, Bistro Friendly Food.
The Warta River.
The Warta River.

Despite the holiday,* the weather was amazing— and I decided to rent a bike and explore Poznań a little more. It’s a very pretty city, and feels much more Polish that the once-German Wrocław where I’ve been living.

Graffiti.
Graffiti.

I was also distracted by the discovery that there was a great Mexican restaurant down the street from my hostel. If you’re looking for spicy Mexican food, stop in to Mamasitas.

Enchiladas at Mamasitas.
Enchiladas at Mamasitas.

While I was in Poznan, I made a day trip to the picturesque town of Gniezno, about a half hour by train.

Why Gniezno? Well, I am part Polish, and my Polish great-greats are from this approximate area. Although none of my ancestors were from this specific city, when I checked Google Maps, the town they were from, Brzyskorzystew, appeared to be the middle of no where. Which makes sense, as the Jasińskis were likely farmers. I wasn’t even sure if I could get a PolBus out that way (or pronounce it properly! 14 letters and only 2 vowels…)

The Cathedral Basilica in Gniezno.
The Cathedral Basilica in Gniezno.

However, as I was doing some amateur genealogy work, I wound up in contact with the Archdiocese of Gniezno, where my family’s records— birth and marriage certificates— were held. And looking online, Gniezno looked pretty, easy to get to from Poznan, and at least I would get to see a snapshot of the Polish countryside that my great-greats likely lived in.

Second from left, my great-grandmother, whose father was born in Poland.
Second from left, my great-grandmother, whose father was born in Poland.
View from the top of the Gniezno Cathedral.
View from the top of the Gniezno Cathedral.
Inside the Gniezno Cathedral.
Inside the Gniezno Cathedral.

Also, if you have Polish ancestors and are thinking about looking them up, this is a great blog: https://pastprologue.wordpress.com/

*Corpus Christi, a church holiday, in case you’re wondering.